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About The Alliance
Our Principles
We believe that all Maine people have a right to a healthy environment where we live, work and play.
We envision a future free of exposure to harmful chemicals in our air, water or food.
We want our children to grow up healthy with every opportunity to thrive.
We seek to build a healthy economy that provides good jobs producing clean products and services.
We are proud of all that’s been accomplished so far toward a clean and healthy Maine.

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This report is a collaborative effort of the Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families coalition, a campaign dedicated to protecting American families from toxic chemicals. The report incorporates a significant body of peer-reviewed science on chemicals and health. Download the report.



 

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Our View: Labeling would help keep toxins away from Maine kids
Maine Sunday Telegram - 4/6/2014. 
They’re in the lunch boxes and backpacks youngsters take to school, the raincoats they wear during recess, the toys they play with after school. They’re phthalates, chemicals that have been linked to serious health problems in kids, including birth defects and learning disabilities, and could lead to their developing cancer as adults. And given that phthalates can be found in hundreds of products – many more than can be listed in one paragraph – avoiding them is nearly impossible.
Feds order company to stop using pesticide in food containers to prevent mold, bacteria
The Oregonian - 4/2/2014. 
By Lynne Terry - The Environmental Protection Agency has ordered a New Jersey company against using a pesticide [nanosilver] in food storage containers, claiming it prevents the growth of mold, fungus and bacteria.
New Report: Maine people are polluted with phthalates
ACHM Announcements - 3/18/2014. 
(AUGUSTA) Maine people are polluted with chemicals called phthalates, according to a new report released today by the Alliance for a Clean and Healthy Maine. The report, titled “Hormones Disrupted: Toxic Phthalates in Maine People”, captures the stories and reactions of 25 Mainers who provided urine samples to test for the presence of seven different phthalates (pronounced THAL-ates), a group of hormone-disrupting chemicals that are widely used in consumer products.
Tests of 25 Mainers find high levels of chemicals used in plastics
Bangor Daily News - 3/18/2014. 
By Jackie Farwell - Augusta: The test results are in for 25 Mainers who recently volunteered to test their bodies for a battery of chemicals commonly found in consumer products. Every participant, from current and former lawmakers to mothers and an electrician, tested positive for phthalates, a group of chemicals used to soften plastics that studies have linked to serious health problems.
Insecticides linger in homes, study finds
The Sacramento Bee - 2/25/2014. 
By Edward Ortiz - The insecticides found in roach sprays, flea bombs, ant traps and pet shampoos persist indoors for years after use and collect in the bodies of both adults and children, for whom they may pose health risks, a new UC Davis study has concluded.
Toxic Chemicals Linked to 'Global, Silent Pandemic' Striking Children Worldwide
Common Dreams - 2/17/2014. 
By Andrea Germanos - Toxic chemicals including some pesticides and solvents may be behind the increasing number of cases of neurodevelopmental disabilities – including autism and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder – among children, researchers warn.
'Putting the next generation of brains in danger'
CNN - 2/15/2014. 
By Saundra Young - Neurotoxicants – substances that impact brain development and can cause neurodevelopmental disabilities – include methylmercury, arsenic, PCBs, toluene, manganese, fluoride, tetrachloroethylene, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (flame retardants) and two pesticides, chlorpyrifos and DDT.
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